Phase 2 School Holidays, What’s Next
May 19, 2022

Phase 2 School Holidays, What’s Next?

WRITTEN BY SUPRIYA KOTWAL, SCHOOL COUNSELLOR, AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL SINGAPORE

 

As Singapore enters Phase Two with Circuit Breaker restrictions being relaxed and more opportunities for to be about and about, many of us  are still reeling from the roller coaster that COVID 19 has been, and continues to be, globally. Now that school holidays are here,  AIS’ school counsellors offer strategies and resources  to support you and your family’s emotional wellbeing.

 

COVID 19 has been traumatic in different ways and to varying extents for all of us. Some of the after-effects that you or your family and friends might be experiencing may include fear; a sense of vulnerability or feeling unsafe; questioning your values and belief systems; mood swings; or  reevaluating your priorities.

 

Caring for self and family

 

  • Most parents agree there has been a ‘parenting overload’ in these last few months. As parents. we often relentlessly ‘keep going’ and may not necessarily prioritise self-care. It’s important to remember that  that your self-awareness and compassion as a parent is significant in times like these. Stick a ‘post-it note’ on your fridge (or your mirror, or whatever works for you!)  to serve as a visual reminder to be even more generous and kind to yourself and your family during the upcoming break.

 

  • Routine and structure are a parent’s best friends – even during the holidays! Planning a loose structure for the day or an informal  family agreement which  includes everyone’s responsibilities (as well as your non-negotiables!) can go a long way to preserving your sanity.

 

There have been many aspects of COVID 19, such as the unpredictability and lack of control, which have brought about collective trauma. Feeling a ‘lack of control’ is linked to high stress levels. To counter this perceived sense of helplessness and regain control,  we can chip away, little by little, by focusing our efforts and energy on those areas of our lives that we can control or influence. Focusing on what we can do and what we can change may also reduce frustration caused by a sense of helplessness.

Image Source: https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/resilience-and-locus-control-time-pandemic

 

Keeping entertained at home

 

As we start to re-discover biking trails and hikes now that Phase 2 has begun,  re-frequent our favourite cafes and restaurants and indulge in some retail therapy, we will still be spending a large amount of time at home. The Washington Post has a great article on vision boards which are a fun and therapeutic family art activity to do during the break to cultivate a sense of looking forward with cautious optimism. Also the National Gallery of Singapore has numerous digital offerings for you to enjoy from home.

 

 

 

 

And not to be missed, check out the best virtual tours in Australia:

 

We hope these ideas and resources help to make the upcoming break easier and more enjoyable for you and your family.